The Top 10 Economic and Money Board Games

In 1883, George Parker (later joined by his brother Charles in the game business) published the board game Banking. Ever since, games with economic themes have been a staple. Here are some of the very best money management board games.

  • 01 of 10
    Acquire
    Acquire. Image courtesy of Wizards of the Coast / Hasbro

    Players invest in companies, strategically trying to hold a majority of stock. Businesses grow and merge as tiles are added to the board; each game develops differently. Acquire has been published several times over the years, a testament to its enduring quality.

    For 2 to 6 players, ages 12 and up. Published by Hasbro.

  • 02 of 10
    Power Grid
    Power Grid. Image courtesy of Rio Grande Games

    Players are tasked with supplying cities with power and competing against each other to buy power plants and raw materials to source their energy grid. 

    For 2 to 6 players, ages 12 and up. Published by Rio Grande Games.

  • 03 of 10

    Automobile

    Automobile
    Automobile. Image courtesy of Warfrog Games

    Players compete in the automobile industry to produce vehicles, ranging from low to high-value cars. Each player must manage their investments in manufacturing while balancing demand for the cars they produce. 

    For 3 to 5 players, ages 12 and up. Published by Mayfair Games/Warfrog.

  • 04 of 10

    In this classic game, players choose their life path by taking risks, gaining and losing money, and dealing with the unexpected. Gameplay moves quickly and the player with the most money wins.

    For 2 to 4 players, ages 8 and up. Published by Hasbro.  

    Continue to 5 of 10 below.
  • 05 of 10

    Modern Art

    In this art auction game, players are the head of an art museum and bid for paintings by modern artists. Popular artists raise the value of your collection and a player's strategy has to change depending on who you're bidding against, so no two games are the same.

    For 2 to 5 players, ages 14 and up. Published by Mayfair Games/Hans im Glück.

  • 06 of 10

    Dutch auctions reign, as players are transported to 1600 to compete in categories like shipping, warehouses, and foreign and domestic trade. The mechanical clock adds a nice psychological element to the game—don't bid too early.

    For 3 to 5 players, ages 10 and up. Published by Rio Grande Games/Jumbo.

  • 07 of 10

    Also known as Brass: Lancashire, this economic strategy game takes place in the industrial revolution. Players create, build and secure their industries and then sell their goods. 

    For 3 to 4 players, ages 14 and up. Published by Warfrog/Eagle Games.

  • 08 of 10

    Everything can be negotiated in Genoa, which was previously released as Traders of Genoa. Players acquire goods and fill orders to earn money, relying on their fellow players to be making deals all along the way.

    For 2 to 5 players, ages 12 and up. Published by Alea/Rio Grande Games/Asmodée Editions.

    Continue to 9 of 10 below.
  • 09 of 10

    Taking turns moving around the 31-day board, players must manage their expected (and unexpected) finances the whole month, while waiting to receive a paycheck at the end of each month. The player with the highest net worth at the end of the game wins. 

    For 2 to 4 players, ages 8 and up. Published by Hasbro. 

  • 10 of 10
    Monopoly
    Monopoly. Image courtesy of Hasbro

    Perhaps the best-known of all modern board games, Monopoly is the classic game of buying and selling real estate. Players can opt for the classic rules or play with some of the many variations on this family favorite. 

    For 2-8 players, ages 8 and up. Published by Hasbro.