Tiffany's Laurelton Hall in Photos

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    Daffodil Terrace from Laurelton Hall

    The Recreated Daffodil Terrace at the Morse Museum of American Art
    As Recreated at the Morse Museum The Recreated Daffodil Terrace at the Morse Museum of American Art. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    Salvaged Decorative Art at the Morse Museum

    Louis Comfort Tiffany's grand Long Island estate known as Laurelton Hall perished in 1957, and was abandoned even prior to that time. Fortunately for fans of Tiffany's work and contributions to the decorative arts world, many objects from the home and its grounds were salvaged and have been subsequently brought back to life at the Morse Museum of American Art in Winter Park, Florida. This includes the Tiffany chapel along with the sampling of items shared here.

    The Laurelton Hall exhibit consists of several galleries within the Morse collection. The museum in its entirety holds a a number of impressive displays including Tiffany lamps, glass, pottery, stained glass and jewelry.

    The Daffodil Terrace was added to the main Laurelton Hall house by Louis Comfort Tiffany in 1915 or 1916. It integrated the interior of the house with the surrounding gardens. It was comprised of eight Carrara marble columns topped with with concrete capitals encrusted with cast-glass daffodils made by Tiffany Studios.

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    Daffodil Terrace from Laurelton Hall

    Original 1920s Photograph of the Daffodil Terrace as part of Laurelton Hall
    1920s Photograph Original 1920s Photograph of the Daffodil Terrace as part of Laurelton Hall. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    A view of the Daffodil Terrace as it stood on the Laurelton Hall estate built by Louis Comfort Tiffany in the early 1900s.

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    Daffodil Terrace Capital from Laurelton Hall

    Tiffany Cast Glass Flowers and Concrete Make Up This Capital from the Daffodil Terrace
    Tiffany Cast Glass Flowers and Concrete Make Up This Capital from the Daffodil Terrace. tiffany, cast, glass, flowers, concrete, capitals, daffodil terrace

    One of the eight capitals comprised of concrete and cast Tiffany glass that make up the Daffodil Terrace. These sit upon marble columns and were salvaged from the remains of Louis Comfort Tiffany's Laurelton Hall estate.

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    Reception Hall & Dining Room Objects from Laurelton Hall

    Laurelton Hall Reception Hall & Dining Room Objects Showcased at the Morse Museum of American Art
    Laurelton Hall Reception Hall & Dining Room Objects Showcased at the Morse Museum of American Art. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    The reception hall and dining room galleries at the Morse Museum of American Art showcase some of the original objects once held in Louis Comfort Tiffany's home. This includes a recreation of the fountain that supplied water to a stream that ran through the home, as indicated by the blue floor tiles. The clear vase in the center of the fountain made by Steuben represents an orange Tiffany Studios vase that was part of the original.

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    Original Reception Hall Fountain Vase

    Tiffany Studios Vase from the Reception Hall at Laurelton Hall
    Tiffany Studios Vase from the Reception Hall at Laurelton Hall. Photo courtesy of Morse Museum of American Art

    Dating to 1903, this Tiffany Studios vase originally served as a font in the reception hall of Louis Comfort Tiffany's estate known as Laurelton Hall.

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    Tiffany Studios Hanging Globe from Laurelton Hall

    Tiffany Studios Hanging Globe from Laurelton Hall
    Tiffany Studios Hanging Globe from Laurelton Hall. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    This hanging globe made by Tiffany Studios in 1905 once graced the reception hall of Louis Comfort Tiffany's Laurelton Hall home on Long Island. It now resides at the Morse Museum of American Art.

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    Dining Room Objects from Laurelton Hall

    Louis Comfort Tiffany's Laurelton Hall Dining Room Recreated at the Morse Museum of American Art
    Louis Comfort Tiffany's Laurelton Hall Dining Room Recreated at the Morse Museum of American Art. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    A number of the rugs, the dining set, stained glass and other objects once used in Louis Comfort Tiffany's Laurelton Hall dining room were salvaged and are now on display at the Morse Museum of American Art.

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    Dining Room at Laurelton Hall in 1946

    Archival Photo Depicting the Laurelton Hall Dining Room in 1946
    Archival Photo Depicting the Laurelton Hall Dining Room in 1946. Photo Courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    The foundation established by Louis Comfort Tiffany to care for his estate fell on hard times after his death in 1933, and by 1946 most of the contents of Laurelton Hall were auctioned off. This photo depicts the dining room as it stood prior to the auction. Objects salvaged from the room after a fire destroyed the home in 1957 are now on display at the Morse Museum of American Art.

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    Transom Window Panel from Laurelton Hall's Dining Room

    Detail of Transom Window Panel from Laurelton Hall's Dining Room
    Detail of Transom Window Panel from Laurelton Hall's Dining Room. Photo Courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    This is one of a number of the window panels salvaged from the ruins of Laurelton Hall's dining room. It was made by Tiffany Studios between 1910 and 1920.

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    Living Room Objects from Laurelton Hall

    Objects from Louis Comfort Tiffany's Laurelton Hall Living Room
    Objects from Louis Comfort Tiffany's Laurelton Hall Living Room. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    Select objects salvaged from the Laurelton Hall living room now reside at the Morse Museum of American Art, including beautiful stained glass made by Tiffany Studios in the early 1900s.

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    Autumn Panel from Four Seasons

    Autumn Four Seasons Panel on Display at the Morse Museum of American Art
    Autumn Four Seasons Panel on Display at the Morse Museum of American Art. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    Salvaged from the Laurelton Hall living room, this is one of the Four Seasons window panels produced by Louis Comfort Tiffany c. 1899–1900. The four panels were exhibited at Exposition Universelle, Paris in 1900 and Prima Exposizione d’Arte Decoration Moderna in Turin, Italy in 1902 before being installed in Louis Comfort Tiffany's home.

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    Laurelton Hall Carved Doors

    Teakwood Doors Made in India and Imported by Tiffany in 1882 for Use in His Homes
    Teakwood Doors Made in India and Imported by Tiffany in 1882 for Use in His Homes. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    As seen leading out of the living room exhibit at the Morse Museum of American Art, these carved doors were created in India and originally installed in Tiffany's New York City home before being moved to the Laurelton Hall estate.

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    Objects from Other Laurelton Hall Rooms

    Objects from Other Laurelton Hall Rooms Housed in One Gallery at the Morse Museum of American Art
    Objects from Other Laurelton Hall Rooms Housed in One Gallery at the Morse Museum of American Art. Photo Courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    Objects salvaged from other Laurelton Hall Rooms are housed in one gallery at the Morse Museum of American Art. This includes windows, ceramics and glass produced by Tiffany Studios among other items.

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    Laurelton Hall Tree of Life Window

    Tree of Life Window Made by Tiffany Studios
    Tree of Life Window Made by Tiffany Studios. Photo by Jay B. Siegel

    The Tree of Life window dates to 1928–31. It was once installed at Louis Comfort Tiffany's grand Laurelton Hall home on Long Island. It now resides at the Morse Museum of American Art in Winter Park, Florida.

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    Laurelton Hall Tiffany Enamel on Copper Vase

    Tiffany Enamel on Copper Vase
    Tiffany Enamel on Copper Vase. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    This enamel on copper vase, c. 1898–1902, was originally on the second-floor balcony of the reception hall at Louis Comfort Tiffany's grand Laurelton Hall estate.

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    Laurelton Hall Tiffany Blown Glass Vase

    Tiffany Favrile Vase from Laurelton Hall
    Tiffany Favrile Vase from Laurelton Hall. Photo courtesy of the Morse Museum of American Art

    This blown glass Tiffany Studios Favrile vase with calla lily motif, c. 1910, was once found on the reception hall second-floor balcony at Laurelton Hall.