Single Crochet Triangle Pattern

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You can use this single crochet triangle in many ways. It could become an applique. You could create bunches of these triangles and stitch them together to create larger projects—afghans, pillows, and placemats. Combine this triangle with other shapes as desired to make interesting motifs and vignettes.

Feel free to use this pattern to make your own creative ideas a reality.

Materials Needed

Yarn: To crochet the sample triangle, use a small amount of Cascade 220, which is a worsted weight yarn.

Crochet Hook: You can use an I / 9—5.50 mm crochet hook to make the sample triangle. This might or might not be the right size hook for the particular project you have in mind. If you want to make a triangle that's the exact same size as this one, this size is a great starting point for a hook. However, you should choose whichever size hook you need to achieve a comfortable tension for the specific yarn or thread you want to use for crocheting your triangle(s).

Tapestry Needle: You will use the tapestry needle to weave in your ends.

Gauge and Finished Size

This sample applique measures about four inches tall and four inches wide at the widest point. If you want a different size, you can easily make larger or smaller triangles just by changing the materials you use.

For smaller triangles, try working with crochet thread or fine yarn.

For larger triangles, try bulky, chunky, or super bulky yarns. For really large triangles, try holding two or more strands of bulky or super bulky yarn together when working the pattern.

For most purposes, you don't need to match this gauge exactly to achieve success. However, if you want to use bunches of triangles together in the same project, you do need to match your own gauge so that all the triangles will be the same size, and will fit together nicely when you piece them together.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern

How to Crochet the Triangle Shape

ch 14.

Row 1: sc in 1st ch from hook and ea ch across for a total of 13 sc.

ch 1, turn.

Row 2: sc2tog. 1 sc in ea of the next 9 sts. sc2tog.

ch 1, turn.

Row 3: 1 sc in ea st across the row. You'll have a total of 11 sc sts in the row.

ch 1, turn.

Row 4: sc2tog. 1 sc in ea of the next 7 sts. sc2tog.

ch 1, turn.

Row 5: 1 sc in ea st across the row. You'll have a total of 9sc sts in the row.

ch 1, turn.

Row 6: sc2tog. 1 sc in ea of the next 5 sts. sc2tog.

ch 1, turn.

Row 7: 1 sc in ea st across the row. You'll have a total of 7sc sts in the row.

ch 1, turn.

Row 8: Rep row 7.

Row 9: sc2tog. 1 sc in ea of the next 3 sts. sc2tog.

ch 1, turn.

Row 10: 1 sc in ea st across the row. You'll have a total of 5 sc sts in the row.

ch 1, turn.

Row 11: sc2tog. 1 sc in next st. sc2tog.

ch 1, turn.

Row 12: 1 sc in ea st across the row for a total of 3 sc sts in the row.

ch 1, turn.

Row 13: sc3tog.

Round 14: Ch 1. Work a round of sl st all the way around the outer edge of the triangle shape, putting 1 extra ch st in corners if desired, including the one at the top of the triangle. The extra chs make the corners a bit pointier, and a bit more pronounced, so that they stand out more. If you don't add the extra ch sts, the corners will appear more rounded than they look on my project sample.

End off. Weave in your loose ends.